GEAR

Managerial accounting [ebook]

Title

Managerial accounting [ebook]

Description

Kurt Heisinger and Joe Ben Hoyle believe that students want to learn accounting in the most efficient way possible, balancing coursework with personal schedules. They tend to focus on their studies in short intense segments between jobs, classes, and family commitments. Meanwhile, the accounting industry has endured dramatic shifts since the collapse of Enron and WorldCom, causing a renewed focus on ethical behavior in accounting. This dynamic author team designed Managerial Accounting to work within the confines of today’s students’ lives while delivering a modern look at managerial accounting.

Managerial Accounting was written around three major themes: Ready, Reinforcement and Relevance. This book is aimed squarely at the new learning styles evident with today’s students and addresses accounting industry changes as well.

Ready. Your students want to be as efficient as possible in their learning. This book adopts a concise, jargon-free, and easy-to-understand approach that is ready with concise sections and concepts when the student is ready to study in a format the student wants. Key concepts are provided in short segments with bullet points and step-by-step instructions to simplify concepts. This thoughtful, step-wise approach will help your students avoid distractions and focuses attention on the big picture.

Reinforcement. Managerial Accounting boasts “Review Problems” at the end of each major section or learning objective which offer practical opportunities for students to apply what they have learned. These “Review Problems” allow students to immediately reinforce what they have learned and are provided within the body of the chapter along with the solutions.

Relevance. Why is managerial accounting important? Since all students perform better when they can answer the “why” question, meaningful references to companies throughout the chapters help students tie the concepts presented in each chapter to real organizations. In addition, realistic managerial scenarios present an issue that must be addressed by the management accountant. These will pique your students’ interest and were designed to show how issues can be resolved using the concepts presented in the chapter. Finally, “Business in Action” features in Managerial Accounting link managerial decision-making to real business decisions to help your students complete the learning cycle from concept, to accounting decision, to real-world application.

Managerial Accounting by Heisinger and Hoyle also contains a handful of other pedagogical aids to compliment your lectures and help your students come to class prepared. From a focus on decision-making, to end of chapter materials that can only be characterized as very deep and very wide, to ethics coverage, group projects and spreadsheet applications—these features allow you to teach the course you want to teach and assign the materials you like to assign.

Creator

Table Of Contents

Chapter 1: What Is Financial Accounting and Why Is It Important?
Chapter 2: What Should Decision Makers Know in Order to Make Good Decisions about an Organization?
Chapter 3: How Is Financial Information Delivered to Decision Makers Such as Investors and Creditors?
Chapter 4: How Does an Organization Accumulate and Organize the Information Necessary to Create Financial Statements?
Chapter 5: Why Is Financial Information Adjusted Prior to the Production of Financial Statements?
Chapter 6: Why Should Decision Makers Trust Financial Statements?
Chapter 7: In Financial Reporting
What Information Is Conveyed about Receivables?
Chapter 8: How Does a Company Gather Information about Its Inventory?
Chapter 9: Why Does a Company Need a Cost Flow Assumption in Reporting Inventory?
Chapter 10: In a Set of Financial Statements
What Information Is Conveyed about Property and Equipment?
Chapter 11: In a Set of Financial Statements
What Information Is Conveyed about Intangible Assets?
Chapter 12: In a Set of Financial Statements What Information Is Conveyed about Equity Investments?
Chapter 13: In a Set of Financial Statements
What Information Is Conveyed about Current and Contingent Liabilities?
Chapter 14: In a Set of Financial Statements
What Information Is Conveyed about Noncurrent Liabilities Such as Bonds?
Chapter 15: In a Set of Financial Statements What Information Is Conveyed about Other Noncurrent Liabilities?
Chapter 16: In a Set of Financial Statements What Information Is Conveyed about Shareholders’ Equity?
Chapter 17: In a Set of Financial Statements What Information Is Conveyed by the Statement of Cash Flows?

Publisher

Saylor.org

Date Copyrighted

Source

Saylor.org, Accessed 1/22/2016.

Format

PDF

Extent

972 pages

Contributor

Provenance

ISBN (if available)

978-1-4533452-9-0

Citation

Hoyle, Joe, “Managerial accounting [ebook],” GEAR, accessed September 24, 2017, http://gear.athenstech.edu/items/show/7.

Social Bookmarking

License

Creative Commons License

Embed

Copy the code below into your web page